Saturday, October 24, 2015

Arrow River Falls
















 
Another Canadian waterfall, this one a little closer to home.  It's roughly a 15 mile drive from my house (only about 5 or 6 miles as the crow flies) and about a half-mile walk through the woods from the nearest road.  There is no established trail to this waterfall.  It's on the Arrow River, which flows south into the Pigeon River, which flows into Lake Superior.  The Pigeon River is the international boundary between the U.S. and Canada.  There is a giant pool at the base of the falls, and on the downstream side of the pool there are these large rocks which make a perfect spot for standing and posing for a self-portrait :-) 

2 comments:

Mark Harris said...

Hi, I love your photos of Arrow River Falls.

I am hoping to visit in late April. Do you have any tips for accessing the falls from the road? I've read that you can rock-hop upstream, but am worried that the flow may be too high at this time of year. Some tips online say that there is a trail, but I can't confirm this. Is it easy to hike your own path through the woods near the creek, or is it very thick?

Thanks for any tips that you can provide.

Mark

Travis Novitsky said...

Hi Mark,

Thanks for your comment!

I have never tried rock-hopping upstream, the water would have to be really low for that to work... and most of the time it's not really low. I also find walking right along the river bank to be quite cumbersome, usually it's easier to walk in the woods parallel to the river. I was able to find the start of a trail on the west side of the river, but it disappears rather quickly. The waterfall is easier to access and photograph on the east side.

I found an old skidder trail just a short distance east of the Arrow River bridge and followed that into a logging cut. I then basically walked straight north across the logging cut to the river. It's not very far. At most it's one mile from the road to the falls, but I think it's probably less than that. Once you get to the north edge of the logging cut you'll be able to hear the river. You'll have to cut through the woods maybe 100 to 150 feet to get to the river, and when you get to the river you should almost immediately be able to see the waterfall upstream.